War in Ukraine, China Crisis, Debt Records – Why 2023 will be a fateful year for the West



The world as a kaleidoscope of crises

Uprisings in Iran and China (photos above), the surprisingly successful resistance of Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy (bottom left) and the newly gained strength of the USA under President Joe Biden – the balance of power in the world is shifting.

(Photo: Getty Images)

Dusseldorf, Brussels A short, uncertain laugh went through the meeting room in Davos when George Soros, the investor and philanthropist, outlined the topic of his speech. He spoke of a possible Third World War and the danger that “our civilization will not survive it”. It’s been a little over half a year since the show.

The shock of the Russian war of aggression against the Ukraine and the exorbitantly increased energy costs was deep down when the elite from politics, business and civil society met in the summer of 2022 in the Swiss mountains – due to the pandemic, exceptionally in front of lush summer meadows, not in front of snow-covered slopes.

This year, the World Economic Forum will meet again at its usual time in January. And even if there is no question of a return to normality, the mood has brightened somewhat. The apocalypse has been canceled for the time being, at least from an economic perspective.

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