Traffic light to promote nuclear fusion – SPD and Greens against it

Traffic light to promote nuclear fusion – SPD and Greens against it


Jens Spahn in the Bundestag

The CDU politician received opposition from the traffic light coalition.

(Photo: IMAGO/Political Moments)

Berlin Of the CDU-Politician Jens Spahn has appealed to the federal government Nuclear fusion as an energy source in Germany with a total of 200 million euros. The advances in technology recently announced in the USA should “be an incentive to continue researching them,” Spahn told the news portal Web.de News. nuclear fusion could be a climate-neutral solution for the energy supply. However, he received opposition from the traffic light coalition.

“For decades, nuclear fusion has been a project worth billions, which has long since been overtaken by renewable energies in terms of usability,” said Nina Scheer, spokeswoman for climate and energy policy SPD-Bundestag parliamentary group, the news portal. Advances in research should not be confused with decisions about energy production.

The Greens member of the Bundestag, Bernhard Herrmann, made a similar statement: “The nuclear fusion cannot contribute to the energy supply in the foreseeable future. Forecasts as to when nuclear fusion will be ready for use are regularly delayed by decades.” In order to curb global warming, however, a rapid reduction in CO2 emissions is necessary.

In the nuclear fusion Unlike in the reactors of nuclear power plants, atomic nuclei are fused instead of split. Theoretically, very large amounts of energy could be generated in this way – and in a climate-neutral manner. In practice, however, this has so far been difficult. The US government had declared a few weeks ago that it had succeeded for the first time in fusing atomic nuclei to gain more energy than was consumed.

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However, it is questionable whether and when the technology can be used to generate energy on a large scale. As early as the 1980s, scientists announced “breakthroughs” that ultimately did not turn out to be such. What is undisputed, however, is that progress has been made in recent years.

More: New group of experts to promote nuclear fusion in Germany



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