The majority of Germans want a wealth tax for the “rich”


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According to a study by the Bertelsmann Foundation, the majority of Germans want a fairer redistribution of wealth.


(Photo: dpa)

Berlin The vast majority of people in this country would like to see if the rich had to give away more of their wealth. This is shown by the results of a representative survey for a study by Bertelsmann Foundation to the sense of justice Germany.

According to this, three out of four adults (75.3 percent) agree that the state should “make sure that the gap between rich and poor is narrowed”. About as many people (76.5 percent) would like a wealth tax for the “rich”. or even very well. However, the question did not specify who counts among the “rich” and from what amount the assets should be taxed.

The distributive injustice felt by the majority has its roots in From the point of view of many German citizens, among other things, in a non-performance-related remuneration. Not even one in four (23.7 percent) agreed with the statement “In Germany you are paid according to your performance”. When the pollsters wanted to know whether their own income was considered fair compared to what others received, the agreement was slightly higher at around 35 percent.

The researchers also found that the urge to redistribute decreases somewhat when it comes to your own wallet. According to the study, only 37 percent of those surveyed would be willing to pay more Steer to pay, if poorer people would get more financial support from the state. It is interesting that those who have a lower net income are more willing to give something of it for this goal than those who have more money at their disposal.

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For the study, which was accompanied by the Ifo Institute, 4,900 people between the ages of 18 and 69 were interviewed nationwide in autumn 2021 by the company Bilendi&respondi.

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