Medicine Nobel laureate at The Spark on the brain



Thomas Südhof (left) in an interview with Handelsblatt Editor-in-Chief Sebastian Matthes

“In science, if you assume you’re going to win a Nobel Prize, you’re in the wrong profession.”

(Photo: Marc-Steffen Unger)

Berlin The German biochemist Thomas Südhof has been investigating how brain cells communicate with one another since the 1980s. The results of his research form the basis for therapies, for example against Alzheimer’s. In 2013 he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine. The 66-year-old has been working in the USA since 1983, currently at Stanford University.

On the occasion of Presentation of the German digital prize “The Spark” in Berlin, Südhof spoke about his fascination with the human brain, the importance of new technologies in science and why US research is more dynamic than German.

Read the full interview here:

Mr. Südhof, In 2013 you were awarded the Nobel Prize in Medicine. Was that your motivation?
In science, if you assume you’re going to win a Nobel Prize, you’re in the wrong profession. You have to have fun discovering things and seeing new things. Science is hard bread, and if you don’t enjoy it, you won’t succeed.

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