Climate and Hunger: Oxfam: Famines in climate trouble spots more than doubled


climate and hunger
Oxfam: Famines in climate hotspots more than doubled

Woman with goats: desert area near Bandar Beyla in the north-east of the autonomous region of Puntland.  Photo: Ben Curtis/AP/dpa

Woman with goats: desert area near Bandar Beyla in the north-east of the autonomous region of Puntland. photo

© Ben Curtis/AP/dpa

The numbers are alarming: In ten countries, 48 ​​million people are currently suffering from acute hunger - an increase of 21 million since 2016.

The earth has already warmed up by about one degree compared to pre-industrial times - and that's why, according to an Oxfam study, ten severely affected are struggling climate-Trouble spots more than twice as many people with acute hunger as just a few years ago.

In these countries, 48 ​​million people are currently suffering from acute hunger - an increase of 21 million since 2016. And 18 million of them are even at risk of dying of hunger, according to the published report Oxfam-Study "Hunger in a heating world". At the same time, the aid organization pointed out that the profit that the fossil energy companies make within 18 days would cover the entire global humanitarian aid need estimated by the UN for 2022.

"Climate change is no longer just a ticking time bomb"

Gabriela Bucher, Director General of Oxfam International, said: "Climate change is no longer just a ticking time bomb, but one that is exploding right before our eyes." The climate crisis brings with it more and more extreme weather conditions such as droughts, hurricanes and floods. These have quintupled in the last 50 years, are occurring more frequently and claiming more and more lives.

The study identifies the ten most affected climate hot spots: Somalia, Haiti, Djibouti, Kenya, Niger, Afghanistan, Guatemala, Madagascar, Burkina Faso and Zimbabwe. These countries have been hit the hardest by extreme weather events over the past two decades. Bucher said of the situation there: "Millions of people who are already suffering from ongoing conflicts, rampant inequality and economic crises are now losing their livelihoods as a result of storm disasters, extreme climate events and the creeping changes."

According to Oxfam, the daily profits of fossil fuel companies have averaged $2.8 billion over the past 50 years. The profits in less than 18 days could cover the $49 billion that the U.N. will be needed to meet all humanitarian needs in 2022, it said. Polluting companies should be taxed more, Oxfam said.

dpa



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